Investment in cycling can increase bike journeys, study shows

I was going to do a Twitter link to this, but felt this was worth featuring as a post. This is a great article on The Guardian, looking at the clear benefits of investing in cycling infrastructure compared to investing in roads. Thanks to James Barker for the link.

The Department for Transport must endorse a new study that proves spending to achieve a goal really works.

     Environment     Bike blog Bike blog     Previous     Blog home Investment in cycling can increase bike journeys, study shows The Department for Transport must endorse a new study that proves spending to achieve a goal really works Beta     Share 182     inShare8     Email Bike Blog and Spectator : Cyclist by a green bicycle traffic light If local and national government invested in cycling, there would be a quantifiable increase in the amount of cycling and a corresponding drop in journey made by private motor car, researchers found. Photograph: Sami Sarkis/Getty Images Investment in cycling can increase bike journeys, study shows. The Department for Transport must endorse a new study that proves spending to achieve a goal really works. op in journey made by private motor car, researchers found. Photograph: Sami Sarkis/Getty Images

Investment in cycling can increase bike journeys, study shows
The Department for Transport must endorse a new study that proves spending to achieve a goal really works
Photograph: Sami Sarkis/Getty Images

Financial investment in cycling can increase the share of journeys undertaken on bike, according to a new peer-reviewed study. This might seem like a do-bears-poop-in-the-woods sort of question but it’s not always cut-and-dried that spending to achieve a goal actually works. Look at roadbuilding: billions of pounds are pumped into constructing new roads in order to reduce congestion, yet congestion keeps on increasing.

However, if local and national government invested in cycling, there would be a quantifiable increase in the amount of cycling and a corresponding drop in journey made by private motor car, found the researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, who published their work in the journal Social Science & Medicine.

For public health reasons this is exceedingly good news but to a car-centric Department for Transport (DfT) the study poses a problem: there’s a deep fear of being seen to be waging a “war on motorists”. The work is based on the Cycling Demonstration Towns project by Cycling England, a quango abolished by the government in 2010. I asked three people at the DfT for comment on the study, which also highlights the health and environmental benefits of cycling, but none replied.

Read the rest of the article here.

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