NE Lincs Cycle Superhighways proposal

CS LondonLondon mayor Boris Johnson and the DfT have made the term cycling superhighways one that we are familiar with. This is a proposal to have a network of genuine cycle superhighways in NE Lincs, and to ensure they actually do fit the description by being designed and built to top quality standards.

CS2These should not be shared pavements the like of which we see on the Humberston/Healing Pedalways & along part of Scartho Rd, where the limited space is shared with pedestrians and the paths always give way to side streets. On many of the routes proposed below there’s plenty of space to create physically separated, high quality cycle lanes/paths on each side of the road in addition to the pavements. Where there is less space the cycleway should still be separated from motor traffic but be a bi-directional path on just one side of the road.

At present there is clearly no grand plan for cycling although things are improving incrementally. There are a few good quality cycle paths (I’ve featured these here in a previous post), but mainly all we have in NE Lincs is just a hotch-potch of isolated stretches of poor quality painted-on lanes. These do nothing to encourage cycling because they are not safe or pleasant to use.

cs33These proposed five cycle superhighways provide an essential skeleton of major routes around which further minor link routes could be developed as time goes by. If these five routes were established in the way described, they would provide an interconnected, safe and pleasant way to cycle between the main residential areas, the town centres, the main train stations, the main shopping areas/stores and the main areas of employment and education.

This would enable and encourage many more people to use cycling as a means of everyday transport. This not only helps those cycling become healthier by getting daily moderate exercise, but also benefits everyone else by reducing traffic congestion, air pollution and noise pollution, and so makes the whole area a better place to live.

So here are my suggestions for the NE Lincs Cycling Superhighways:

  • CS1 Pleasure Island to the oil refineries (CS1W) and HST (CS1N)
  • CS2 Morrisons to Isaacs Hill
  • CS3 Waltham roundabout to the A180 (CS3W) and Cleethorpes Rd (CS3E)
  • CS4 Grimsby train station to Immingham
  • CS5 Waltham roundabout to Cleethorpes promenade

Of course, the present cycling budget comes nowhere near covering such a proposal. The funding for these five Cycle Superhighways should be provided from the wider transport budget and central government. If £6m can be found for the recent ”green” development in Grimsby town centre, which I’m not alone in thinking provides very little benefit (many would say it has been a complete waste of money), then the funding for such a network of top quality cycle infrastructure, with all its attendant benefits, can and surely should be provided.

The routes in detail:

CS1: From Pleasure Island in Cleethorpes all along Kings Rd to Cleethorpes Leisure Centre, then along the prom to Cleethorpes train station, through the station onto Station Rd then turning left onto Princes Rd to the bottom of Isaacs Hill in Cleethorpes. Turn right all along Grimsby Rd & Cleethorpes Rd to Riby Sq. Take the road between the flyover and the Telegraph offices (the other direction would be routed under the flyover). Along this road a cycle bridge gently rises to cross the railway line and comes down before the turning for King Edward St. Continuing along Cleethorpe Rd by The Landings, crossing Victoria St and continuing alongside the A180 on the Westward (out of town) side. Once level with Charlton St another cycle bridge gently rises to cross the A180 and comes down at the top of Moody Lane. Continuing along the full length of Moody Lane, a new connecting stretch of cyclepath apx 200m long, with a bridge over the beck, connects with Hobson Way. (I’ve previously written about this here). Along Hobson Way, Laporte Rd (passing Immingham Docks eastgate), then left along Queens Rd, Kings Rd, to the very end of Manby Rd. The route then spurs in two directions:

  • CS1 West: west along Humber Rd (A160) to the lights at the Jet garage opposite the refinery
  • CS1 North: north along Rosper Rd as far as HST on Clough Rd. (This last section from Immingham to Killingholme would require agreement between both NE Linc Council and North Linconshire Council.)

CS2: All the way from alongside Morrisons, the full length of Laceby Rd, across Nunns Corner, then along Weelsby Rd, Clee Rd right through to Isaacs Hill roundabout, where it connects with CS1.

CS3: From Waltham roundabout all along Waltham Rd, Scartho Rd (removing a lane of traffic where necessary to create space for a bi-directional cycleway), around Nunns Corner (crossing CS2) onto Bargate (I’ve written about Bargate in an earlier post here). At the junction with Brighowgate CS3 forks into two:

  • CS3 East: along Brighowgate to Grimsby town station, out onto Osborne St, East St past the Town Hall, right onto Pasture St, left onto East Robinson St, left onto Holles St, right onto Ellis Way, over Hainton Sq onto Eleanor St, left onto Convamore Rd then Victor St connecting with CS1 at Cleethorpes Rd.
  • CS3 West: continuing along Bargate, Cartergate, left onto Lord St, right onto Anderson St, left along the river, right onto Earl St, along Freshney Drve, Yarborough Drive, Freshney Drive, left onto Corporation Rd, right onto Charlton St, connecting with CS1 at the cycle bridge over the A180.

CS4: From Grimsby train station through St James Square, Chantry Lane, Littlefield Lane, Cromwell Rd, Yarborough Rd, then along the route of the Healing Pedalway through to Healing on Great Coates Rd, then extending beyond Healing on Stallingborough Rd through to Stallingborough and on to Immingham. Along Pelham Rd to connect to CS1 at Manby Rd.

CS5: From Waltham roundabout along Station Rd past Toll Bar school, left along Louth Rd, along Peaks Parkway, Hewitt’s Ave, Taylors Ave and Queens Parade to connect with CS1.

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Copenhagen updates

Copenhagen has been doing a lot to accommodate and encourage cycling recently, and here’s another great Streetfilms video showing that. The film features some of the Copenhagenize team proudly demonstrating some of the new features and developments, including the Snake bridge and the Green Wave. Brilliant! If you love cycling, you’ll want to visit Copenhagen!

 

 

Real bicycle culture

Amsterdam: It’s billed as the cycling city of the best cycling nation in the world and it’s not hard to see why. There is simply a culture of cycling which is quite wonderful. It’s just a natural thing there for people to use a bike to get around.

A major part of this is the provision made for cycling – there are cycle streets, cycle paths – people are catered for on bikes. It’s part of the culture because it has been accommodated – there is space for cycling, so it becomes a pleasant way to get around. More people get moderate daily exercise just from cycling to and from places resulting in a healthier population and better air quality as there’s less pollution from cars.

Why can’t we aim to develop a similar culture by building and incorporating such infrastructure here in NE Lincs?

Click to enlarge the photos:

The bike parking near the central rail station.

The bike parking near the central rail station.

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A cycle road, separate to the walkway and the road for vehicles.

A cycle road, separate to the walkway and the road for vehicles.

 

In the queue of cyclists waiting for the change of lights on the cycleway in the busy centre of the city.

In the queue of cyclists waiting for the change of lights on the cycleway in the busy centre of the city.

A father with his children in their cargo bike. It's perfectly safe to travel this way because there is safe cycling infrastructure all over the city.

A father with his children in their cargo bike. It’s perfectly safe to travel this way because there is safe cycling infrastructure all over the city.

Another cargo bike.

Another cargo bike.

This is a minor quiet one-way road where cars are guests and are expected to give priority to cyclists.

This is a minor quiet one-way road where cars are guests and are expected to give priority to cyclists.

Steps in and out of a rail station with provision for wheeling a bike at the side. It's little things like these that add to the bicycling culture. Nice to see the bike being wheeled here is a Brompton! :)

Steps in and out of a rail station with provision for wheeling a bike at the side. It’s little things like these that add to the bicycling culture. Nice to see the bike being wheeled here is a Brompton! 🙂

Bikes everywhere!

Bikes everywhere!

You can ride right through the Rijksmuseum (State Museum), recently reopened with a cycleway through the middle of it!

You can ride right through the Rijksmuseum (State Museum), recently reopened with a cycleway through the middle of it!

And to finish with a nod to Cycle Chic, the ubiquitous 'girl on a bike'!

And to finish with a nod to Cycle Chic, the ubiquitous ‘girl on a bike’!

 

Home Zone

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This is a quietened street in Grimsby, near the junction of Victor St and Oxford St, and it represents a step forward! It’s signed as a ‘Home Zone’ street, where children can play, where car access is restricted and slowed and where residents generally enjoy a more community-based environment.

It would be even better if there was no through access for vehicles. For instance, a row of bollards placed mid-way would enable cycling and walking through but would  prevent cars and vans from making it a short-cut.

It’s a creditable initiative and one that should be replicated on more residential streets.

Dutch cycling city nominees 2014: Enschede

This is the third in a series of articles on Bicycle Dutch, looking at this years contenders for Cycling City 2014, and featuring Enschede, in the east of the country.

You can read the full article here.

Dutch cycling city nominees 2014: Velsen

This is the second in a series of articles on Bicycle Dutch, looking at this years contenders for Cycling City 2014, and featuring Velsen, near the port of Ijmuiden.

You can read the full article here.

 

Dutch cycling city nominees 2014: Zwolle

This is the first of a series of articles on the excellent Bicycle Dutch blog, looking at the contenders for Dutch Cycling City 2014. The first in the series is Zwolle, a city approximately 60 miles north-east of Amsterdam.

You can read the full article here.

Pointing the way forward

For years, the lovely village of Poynton, south east of Manchester, has been blighted by the torrent of traffic streaming through the village centre. I would suggest this problem is symptomatic of many places in the UK, and, if so, then the solution that has been applied in Poynton takes on a much wider significance than just one junction in one village.

The major aspect of this solution seems to be to slow the traffic down to a human scale, which then enables the streets to be re-humanised. It’s an interesting approach.

The council and street designers involved here deserve much credit for taking the ‘bull’ by the horns in seeking to tame it. From a cycling point of view, although I didn’t notice any specific cycleways as such, it seems people walking and people cycling all benefit from a slower, more civilised flow of traffic. I think what the Poynton Regeneration project shows is that this thinking is definitely part of the wider solution our towns and cities need. It’s one step in the right direction. See what you think:

Cycling Copenhagen through North American eyes

For ‘North American’ I think you can also substitute ‘British’ and indeed ‘North East Lincs’ eyes, as well. In complete contrast to the carnage of these last few days in London, where there have been no less than four cyclists killed in eight days, the streets of Copenhagen demonstrate exactly how good and pleasant city cycling can be.

If only the powers that be in this country, both nationally and locally, would open their eyes, see the possibilities and get the vision, our towns and cities could be transformed into something very special indeed.

Another great film from Streetfilms. Enjoy:

Complete streets: It’s about more than just bike lanes

Another great video from Clarence Eckerson Jr at Streetfilms, with a number of significant learning points. I particularly love the fact that even in NYC they want to plant trees and flowers and plants to beautify the streets! This is to be the subject of an upcoming post, but the opportunity to ‘gardenise’ our towns and cities is, I believe, a key potential by-product of prioritising cycling. Read the rest of the accompanying article here.

Over the last four years, New York City has seen a transportation renaissance on its streets, striking a better balance by providing more space for walking, biking, and transit.

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